Now you should take some findings from your research and turn them into narrower challenges that you can try to develop solutions to. To do this, you will create some "how could we" questions.

1. Gather your statements

From your work of finding patterns in your research, you should now have a number of statements that summarize the main themes you have found.

Example: "The young people want to meet more people who live in their immediate area" and "The young people feel insecure when it is dark outside".

Put all your statements in front of you and then move on to the next step.


2. Practice writing a "how could we" question

The next step is to transform your statements into “how could we” questions to turn them into challenges that you can come up with solutions to. When you write your statements in a "how could we" format, it indicates that a solution is possible and gives you the chance to answer them in different ways.

A good "how could we" question does not advocate a specific solution or idea, but gives you the opportunity to think innovatively.

Using the examples above, you could change "young people want to meet more people living in their immediate area" to "how could we connect young people living in the same district so that they can meet new friends"?

Practice writing a "how could we" question to one of your statements.


Write more questions

Now that you have written an exercise question, it is time to create a "how could we" question for each of your statements.

Remember to start with "how could we" and not suggest a solution to your question.

If we had said this in the example above: "How could we connect young people who live in the same district so that they can meet new friends with the help of an app?" then we would have suggested that an app is the right solution. But we do not know this yet, so we will not limit ourselves to that solution.


4. Look again

Now that you have clarified your "how could we" questions, you should review them again. Make sure that they do not suggest solutions but that they can be solved with several different ideas. Also make sure they are not too wide. It can be a little tricky to find the right balance, but if they are too wide, it can be difficult to know where to start.

If we had said this in the previous example: "How could we help young people to meet?" so it could have been a little too wide for us to know where to start. By adding "in its immediate area", it gives us a framework to start generating ideas. Take a look at the video below for another example.

Once you have reviewed your questions again and are happy with them, move on to the next step to prioritize them.

If you follow the guide, go back for the next step.

5. Find patterns and prioritize

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